Christopher Moore Home Page

The bulletin board is currently closed to new posts. Instead, why not check out Chris' Twitter and Facebook pages?


bbs.chrismoore.com Forum Index -> So You Wanna Be a Writer?

Writing Advice from John Steinbeck

  Author    Thread This forum is locked: you cannot post, reply to, or edit topics. This topic is locked: you cannot edit posts or make replies.
chris
Site Admin


Joined: 02 Mar 2004
Posts: 3833
Location: People Republic of Northern California
Writing Advice from John Steinbeck  Reply with quote  

John Steinbeck and Advice for Beginning Writers

"I have written a great many stories and I still don't know how to go about it except to write it and take my chances.."

Dear Writer:

Although it must be a thousand years ago that I sat in a class in story writing at Stanford, I remember the experience very clearly. I was bright-eyes and bushy-brained and prepared to absorb the secret formula for writing good short stories, even great short stories. This illusion was canceled very quickly. The only way to write a good short story, we were told, is to write a good short story. Only after it is written can it be taken apart to see how it was done. It is a most difficult form, as we were told, and the proof lies in how very few great short stories there are in the world.

The basic rule given us was simple and heartbreaking. A story to be effective had to convey something from the writer to the reader, and the power of its offering was the measure of its excellence. Outside of that, there were no rules. A story could be about anything and could use any means and any technique at all - so long as it was effective. As a subhead to this rule, it seemed to be necessary for the writer to know what he wanted to say, in short, what he was talking about. As an exercise we were to try reducing the meat of our story to one sentence, for only then could we know it well enough to enlarge it to three- or six- or ten-thousand words.

So there went the magic formula, the secret ingredient. With no more than that, we were set on the desolate, lonely path of the writer. And we must have turned in some abysmally bad stories. If I had expected to be discovered in a full bloom of excellence, the grades given my efforts quickly disillusioned me. And if I felt unjustly criticized, the judgments of editors for many years afterward upheld my teacher's side, not mine. The low grades on my college stories were echoed in the rejection slips, in the hundreds of rejection slips.

It seemed unfair. I could read a fine story and could even know how it was done. Why could I not then do it myself? Well, I couldn't, and maybe it's because no two stories dare be alike. Over the years I have written a great many stories and I still don't know how to go about it except to write it and take my chances.

If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it. You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story. For a bad story is only an ineffective story.

It is not so very hard to judge a story after it is written, but, after many years, to start a story still scares me to death. I will go so far as to say that the writer who not scared is happily unaware of the remote and tantalizing majesty of the medium.

I remember one last piece of advice given me. It was during the exuberance of the rich and frantic '20s, and I was going out into that world to try and to be a writer.

I was told, "It's going to take a long time, and you haven't got any money. Maybe it would be better if you could go to Europe."

"Why?" I asked.

"Because in Europe poverty is a misfortune, but in America it is shameful. I wonder whether or not you can stand the shame of being poor."

It wasn't too long afterward that the depression came. Then everyone was poor and it was no shame anymore. And so I will never know whether or not I could have stood it. But surely my teacher was right about one thing. It took a long time - a very long time. And it is still going on, and it has never got easier.

She told me it wouldn't.

Post Mon May 10, 2010 5:14 pm   View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
sugarraydodge



Joined: 27 Nov 2007
Posts: 647
Location: Utah
 Reply with quote  

I like this because it's true. I have learned that a writer (i.e. ME) has to develop his own formula after much trial and error, and that the formula he makes won't work with another writer. Thanks for this, AG.
_________________
Scruffy|SRD Books

Post Mon May 10, 2010 9:15 pm   View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website AIM Address
LadyJewelleah



Joined: 22 Aug 2009
Posts: 182
Location: Southern California
 Reply with quote  

Wonderful sentiment and an inspiration to be sure in those dark moments when we writers wonder if we should continue in our quest to write great stories.

Of course, I often think that being a writer is part of one's nature (if they are a writer). If this is a case, then it isn't a matter of a quest at all. Putting words on paper is a way to keep the mind and soul healthy, a lot like eating asparagus keeps the body healthy.

Post Mon May 10, 2010 10:58 pm   View user's profile Send private message
zendao42



Joined: 05 Sep 2006
Posts: 13570
Location: Somewhere in a galaxy near you
 Reply with quote  

Sounds a lot like enlightenment- dunno if that makes me wanna try writing again or not...

Post Tue May 11, 2010 12:39 am   View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
IdiotCroissant



Joined: 04 Nov 2007
Posts: 46
Location: Washington State
writing  Reply with quote  

Quote:
The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader.


I love that quote. The aching urge is truely what it is about. Otherwise sitting down and typing would be impossible. The work of it is too hard.

I need a little yellow sign on my car that says "muse onboard".
_________________
Is that Cheeto Spore?

Post Sun May 16, 2010 7:27 am   View user's profile Send private message
lilcoget



Joined: 03 Nov 2010
Posts: 4
 Reply with quote  

That's pretty much all very poignant and something to think about when you can't think of anything else i.e. fear based block, but on the other hand, it makes me wonder if we're taking it all too seriously. I don't know, maybe it happened when we began to write things down, and to feel the relative permanence of that. Back in the oral tradition days, it was all just big fish stories, and the more you told them, the better they got.
_________________
WTF!

Post Tue Nov 09, 2010 10:51 pm   View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
  Display posts from previous:      
This forum is locked: you cannot post, reply to, or edit topics. This topic is locked: you cannot edit posts or make replies.

Jump to:  


Last Thread | Next Thread  >

Forum Rules:
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

 
Templates created by Vereor and Ken